Violent Teen Carjacking Ring Indicted; Thugs Flaunted Stolen Cars on Social Media

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Violent Carjacking Ring Indicted; Thugs Flaunted Stolen Cars on Social Media

Punks Inc. Carjackers indicted. Posted photos with stolen cars on social media

“The defendants used guns, knives, and violence to carry out their carjacking’s,” said Attorney General Frosh.  “They left a trail of stolen cars, stolen phones, and broken bones.  They showed no remorse.  In fact, they flaunted their exploits on social media.  They face many years behind bars.”

BALTIMORE, MD – The indictments of four defendants: Dalante Graham, 18, of Baltimore; Tyheim Gray, 19, of Baltimore; Daquan Johnson, 18, of Baltimore; and Travon Williamston, 17, of Baltimore for participating in a violent, organized carjacking ring were announced by the Maryland Attorney General on Aug. 13, 2018.  The ring is alleged to have perpetrated multiple vehicle thefts in Baltimore City and Baltimore County.

Daquan Jamar Johnson, of 1013 N. Ellamont Ave., Baltimore, Md., was indicted on 55 serious criminal counts which should find him in prison for the next five lifetimes, but since this is the land of the Alice in Wonderland Maryland Judiciary, the liberal judges of Maryland will likely buy him lunch and let him out of the hoosegow in about a month. The attorney for the alleged multi-level hoodlum and thug Daquan Johnson is not listed on court records and bail was denied, leaving him in the Baltimore County Jail.

 Dalante Graham, of 3102 Westmont Court, Baltimore, Md., and more recently is a resident of the Charles H. Hickey Jr. reform school in Baltimore while he awaits trial and beamed up to the Maryland Prison system where he can kick the butts of people bigger than his 6’0” tall 150 pound frame – those who won’t be afraid of his gun that they won’t allow him to take to prison with him. When charged in December he was being represented by a free attorney provided by the Maryland taxpayers.

Tyheim Devine Anthony Gray, of 1926 Walbrook Ave., Baltimore, Md., is represented by attorney Brian Levy, provided courtesy of the Maryland taxpayers. Gray, at 5”8” tall and 140 pounds, is now a resident of the Baltimore City Jail where he can violently abuse those around him like he allegedly did his carjacking victims.

Travon Maurice Williamston, of 3019 Normount Court, Baltimore, Md., weighing in at 120 pounds and 5’7” will find that without a gun to intimidate his victims he will find it difficult to attack and assault those around in the Baltimore City Jail who will tremble at the thought of him walking through the prison cafeteria.

Prosecutors say that after stealing cars from their victims, the defendants would document themselves “joyriding” and posing next to the stolen vehicles, posting videos and photos on their social media accounts.  The defendants would also wear the key fobs taken from victims on their belts as trophies.  The defendants often used weapons, such as pellet guns, knives, and handguns in order to commit the carjackings and auto thefts.  In some instances, the defendants used unnecessary violence, continuing to assault victims after they had already seized control of the vehicle.  Injuries to the victims ranged from minor bruising to a fractured skull.

The defendants used unnecessary violence, continuing to assault victims after they had already seized control of the vehicle.

Members of the ring used multiple tactics to commit the carjackings.  Often, after intentionally causing superficial vehicle collisions, members of the ring would attack the victims, take their keys and personal items, and then drive away in both vehicles.  Victims were also targeted as they parked in residential or commercial areas, and while victims were walking to or from their homes to their vehicles.

Punk Inc. indicted for armed carjackings and assaults by Baltimore County Grand Jury Aug. 13, 2018

“The defendants used guns, knives, and violence to carry out their carjacking’s,” said Attorney General Frosh.  “They left a trail of stolen cars, stolen phones, and broken bones.  They showed no remorse.  In fact, they flaunted their exploits on social media.  They face many years behind bars.”

 

Additionally, members would sometimes target victims more than once. Specifically, when the defendants stole a key ring with multiple car keys, they would use stolen identification cards or insurance information to determine the victim’s address.  After traveling to the residence, sometimes days or months later, the defendants would use the keys to steal additional vehicles owned by the victim.

 

“These arrests are indicative of the success that can be attained when agencies combine resources to remove violent criminals off the street,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge Gordon B. Johnson.  “The citizens of Maryland have the FBI’s commitment that we will work with our local, state, and federal partners to remove violent criminals from their neighborhoods.”

 

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Charges in the indictments include 26 carjacking or auto-theft incidents, including counts for participating in a criminal gang, armed carjacking, armed robbery, theft between $1,500 and $25,000, use of a handgun in a crime of violence, assault in the 1st and 2nd degree, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, rogue and vagabond, and participating in a theft scheme totaling over $100,000.  If convicted of all charges, the defendants face a maximum penalty of more than 100 years in jail.

 

The defendants’ arraignments will be set in the Circuit Court for Baltimore County.  The investigation was led by the Maryland Office of the Attorney General, the Baltimore City State’s

Attorney’s Office, the Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Office, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Baltimore City Police Department, and the Baltimore County Police Department.

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