U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Munro crew interdicts suspected drug smuggling vessel; two crewmembers jump onto drug-sub and force open hatch

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U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Munro (WMSL 755) crew members aboard the cutter’s 35-foot Long Range Interceptor small boat supervising the intentional sinking of suspected drug-smuggling boats May 17, 2019, following the seizure of cocaine from the boats during an at-sea interdiction while Munro’s crew patrolled international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Due to the distance from land, inadequate tow points and flooding in the engine rooms of the boats, the boats were sunk as a hazard to navigation. U.S. Coast Guard photo

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Munro (WMSL 755) crew members board a self-propelled semi-submersible suspected drug smuggling vessel (SPSS) June 18, 2019, while operating in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Purpose-build smuggling vessels like SPSSs are designed to hold large quantities of contraband while evading detection by law enforcement authorities. U.S. Coast Guard video

Suspected smugglers transit international waters June 6, 2019, in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The Coast Guard works with interagency and international partners to patrol known drug transit zones to deter and disrupt the trafficking of illegal drugs, to dismantle transnational criminal organizations and to prevent transnational threats from reaching the U.S. while fostering regional stability. U.S. Coast Guard video

The engine housings of a go-fast boat has bullet holes June 25, 2019, in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. A Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron precision marksman used disabling-gunfire to stop the boat during a Coast Guard interdiction. During at-sea interdictions in international waters, a suspect vessel is initially detected and monitored by allied, military or law enforcement personnel coordinated by Joint Interagency Task Force-South based in Key West, Florida, and the interdictions including the boardings are led and conducted by members of the U.S. Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard photo

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Munro (WMSL 755) crew members transfer bales of cocaine from the ship’s 35-foot Long Range Interceptor small boat to the cutter June 6, 2019. The cocaine was seized by Munro’s crew following an interdiction of a suspected drug smuggling boat in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. U.S. Coast Guard photo

Bales of cocaine seized by U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Munro (WMSL 755) crew members are on the ship’s deck May 17, 2019, after Munro crewmembers interdicted a suspected drug-smuggling boat in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The Coast Guard works with interagency and international partners to patrol known drug transit zones to deter and disrupt the trafficking of illegal drugs, to dismantle transnational criminal organizations and to prevent transnational threats from reaching the U.S. while fostering regional stability. U.S. Coast Guard photo

On July 11, 2019, Vice-President Mike Pence welcomed back CGC Munro from patrol as they offloaded $569 million of cocaine in San Diego.

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